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memories

Memories No 02 – from Heathrow T5 to Hammersmith

This is my second blog outlining the stories behind my ‘Pictures of the Day’. For this week’s review, I travel to the ends of the Circle, Overground, Piccadilly and the Waterloo & City lines during late May and through June in 2018.

It was an interesting month in terms of locations and experiences as I started getting to grips with my camera settings and with those with whom I met.

You can still play your part in helping me decide on the best picture, as I’d like to canvass your thoughts on which is your favourite picture. You can reply through my blog, directly by email or via my social media platforms. And if you’d like to explain why, that will be helpful too.

So here goes for week 2. I hope you enjoy this?

#08: Heathrow T5: ‘World Rainbow’

23/05/2018 – This is taken outside the main terminus where there’s an open air seating area. It’is a bright sunny lunchtime so employees and travellers alike are grabbing a quick snack or just waiting for their connection.

There’s a large display at either end of the seating area showing a selection of the the IATA (International Air Transport Association) three letter destination codes displayed in a semicircle. This picture tries to capture the essence of the airport at ‘a moment in time’ as the reflection shows those at rest, but the traveller in the centre foreground reminds us that he’s going somewhere (or just arrived). And the smoker on the right reminds us that this is now an outside habit…

I’ve tried to keep the shot simple, framing the main traveller within the destination arc. Who knows where he’s bound? The Alpaca filter strengthens the sunlit shrubbery and helps to draw the eye towards the central figure.

My thanks to a Facebook reader who suggested this title.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Alpaca

#09: Euston – ‘In Loving Memory’

24/05/2018 – This stained glass window is taken inside St Pancras Church and commemorates the life, loves and deaths of the 19th Century architect William Milford Teulon’s family.

This was a poignant moment during my day around Euston station and a moment of admiration too, of the open and free nature of the church: it’s doors open to all comers at all times. I was alone at the time of my visit and able to enjoy the church’s array of stained glass windows. Why this one? 

With the sun shining through, the colour’s magnificence transforms an otherwise dull spot in the church into one of thoughtfulness, hope and salvation to those looking for it. It was a moment not to pass and on reflection, it has provided an opportunity to learn a little about the architect himself.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ3.5; Shutter Speed – 1/60; Focal Length – 20mm; Film Speed – ISO160; Google Photo Filter – Palma

#10: Richmond – ‘Brewers Lane’

06/06/2018 – This is a delightful narrow street of bijou style shops: Brewers Lane. A busy lane for the casual browser and attractive for the tourists no doubt intrigued by the array of advertising signs and banners all fighting for their own space and attention.

The decorative lights, strung across the lane will no doubt increase the attractiveness of the lane, but in broad daylight, it casts a net, as a canopy, over the area.

I’d originally planned to crop out the shoppers and browsers to focus on the shop signs, but on reflection decided to keep them in as they give more meaning and sense of purpose to the picture’s composition.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO250; Google Photo Filter – Palma

#11: Bank – ‘£sd’

07/06/2018 – This is an historical shot for those old enough to remember the pre-decimal paper money. The red-brown ten bob note; the green pound; the rarely seen five pound note and the never seen brown ten pound note. The picture is taken inside the Bank of England’s museum which is  accessed through their airport style entrance in Threadneedle Street.

I think this is an appropriate picture to remember my visit to Bank station

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 43mm; Film Speed – ISO2500; Google Photo Filter – Metro

#12: Clapham Junction – ‘Platform 18’

20/06/2018 – And as with all good stations, there’s a neighbouring watering hole; here it’s classically called The Junction pub which tries to market itself as the 18th platform encouraging travellers into its ‘beer garden’.

The iconic wall art of David Bowie captures my interest immediately as I’m a lifelong fan of his music ever since I was introduced to Ziggy Stardust and his Spiders from Mars. So I have a personal connection with this image, which helps to connect my visit and enjoy the amusing way the pub is exploiting it’s position with the railway station. As you see, the wall on which the image is portrayed is in fact the back of the station.

I’ve cropped the bottom of the image to remove the somewhat untidy nature of the alley and beer garden entrance, and I think the final picture helps to focus on the wall art, the station’s name and its proximity to the station.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Auto

#13: Enfield Town – ‘Enfield Vicarage’

27/06/2018 – 36 Silver Street is Enfield Vicarage, a Grade II listed building with some parts dating back to the 16th Century. Situated next to St Andrew’s Church, this two storey white rendered building is nicely lit in the sunshine.

I’m standing on the opposite side of the road trying to capture this scene through passing traffic as just down the road are traffic lights which control the flow along the street. I’m also trying to judge the passing pedestrians to create a sense of movement against the stark white walls. This lady with her shopping trolley, presumably on her way into town, obliged. I think this shot nicely sets the scene, helped by the fact the pedestrian is wearing a light top in contrast with the brick wall but also complementing the whitewashed walls.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 20mm; Film Speed – ISO250; Google Photo Filter – Auto

#14: Hammersmith – ‘Baguettes

28/06/2018 – Hammersmith open air food market sits nicely along Lyric Square positioned between King Street and Beadon Road, and Olivier’s Bakery is the first stall I approach as I enter the food market. It’s fast approaching lunchtime so the square is very busy with office workers out to sample the variety of culinary delights on offer.

This is my first attempt at ‘food’ photography, but thankfully I was given a free hand to explore the stall without getting in their way as they served their customers.

This is a simple, close up shot of the day’s freshly baked baguettes displayed rather neatly, although more out of necessity so that the stack remains intact. Nevertheless, their colour and geometric shape makes for a rewarding reminder of the day. I’ve enhanced the picture with a yellow filter to promote the baguette’s natural colouring. My free baguette was nice…

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO160; Google Photo Filter – Palma

Categories
overground

#50: Clapham Junction (revisited) – 30/04/2019

Wow! Just over a year on since I started this blog when I took my first nervous step from Gospel Oak in April 2018; and now I’ve completed my 50th journey. An average of one a week that has grown from a simple idea, to one that now has multiple channels to help spread the word.

The station

I first visited Clapham Junction nearly a year ago, so today was a return to complete my visit of the twin Overground line termini. Strange as it is, both termini are on the same platform, though separated by buffers and different parts of the platform named Platform 1 and Platform 2.

Clapham is a busy station with 17 platforms and over a 1,000 trains stopping daily for passengers to change trains to other destinations from Addlestone to Yeovil Junction…and slightly offset in the middle of the platforms are multiple sidings and train sheds where services either start from or end up after all passengers have alighted.

As I head out of the station through the Brighton Yard entrance to make my way to the river, I meet Jermaine and his travelling companion – Sif, a Bearded Dragon.

It is Sif’s picture that makes it as my ‘Picture of the Day’ below, and we chat a little as I enjoy the sight of Sif basking in the sun. The focus of our discussion is the impact of today’s teaching demands on teachers and on their wellbeing; teachers who care passionately about children’s development but are blighted by unrealistic educational targets and dwindling resources. We agree that good support mechanisms can be invaluable but regrettably it’s not universally available.

The Thames Path

My journey today is a relatively short one following the Thames Path from where I’d previously visited in Cotton Row, and I head west as far as Putney, with a flirtatious diversion through fashionable Wandsworth.

Now I’ve referenced The Thames Path many a time before, but this time I’m including a personal reference. My sister in law and her sister, who call themselves ‘Two Welsh Walkers’ are soon to walk the full length of 185 miles from the source of the Thames at Trewsbury Mead in Gloucestershire to the Thames Barrier in aid of Asthma UK. They are lovers of walking and last year completed the 60 mile route of the Caledonian Canal, so I send my best wishes to them on this year’s epic. If you’d like to support their cause, please visit their Just Giving page.

Riverside Views

I can’t begin to imagine how the riverside may have looked a 100 years ago except through historical photographs. Even in my lifetime, 50 years ago it will have looked different to today as almost every stretch of the embankment, as far as the eye can see, has been transformed into a luxury high rise dwelling with magnificent views; and for the hardy marine folk, houseboats adorn part of the embankment too.

Let’s not forget the Thames is still a working river, and I’ve tried to capture the artistry and architecture of some, where today’s light industry meets the shoreline.

Cement works, Pier Terrace
Western Riverside Waste Authority Recycling Facility, Smuggelrs Way

Old Wandsworth

Admittedly I only flirt with old Wandsworth as I detour from the river, but what I see along York Road is a very bijou and fashionable street full of independent shops, cafes and restaurants. One in particular captures my immediate attention; that of a static coffee stall immediately outside the station – CWTCH.

Now those of you who know the Welsh language will recognise this word with affection, and their website nicely defines its meaning as ‘a small Welsh hug’. Not a literal translation, as I don’t think there is one, but it does represents the intent behind the word, although not necessarily the emotion. (There are other meanings too such as cubbyhole or cupboard).

I spend a little time talking with those working there who beam broadly when I ask them if they know what it means, and they explain a little about the stall’s brief history and naming. Ah! Such a welcome sight that makes me smile as I continue with my journey.

I hadn’t realised that Wandsworth gets its name from the river Wandle, and the eagle eye’d of you will know that I’ve encountered the Wandle before during my visit to Morden. The river now reaches its journey’s end as it discharges into the Thames nearby at Bell Lane Creek where a little oasis of peace has been recreated on a small peninsula known as The Spit.

Nearby is one of London’s many Victorian backstreet pubs, and this one with its unusual name captures my interest – The Cat’s Back. The pub has a history of several name changes (formally Brush; Forester’s Arms; Ye Olde House at Home), but in the 1990’s it was renamed after a lost cat returned.

The local community is blessed with much greenery and I notice as I walk through Bramford Gardens, a thriving community garden which has taken over a quiet corner of this unassuming space. And on a much grander scale is the open space and tree lined avenues of Wandsworth Park with its riverside walk, and if you look closely as you walk through, there are several sculptures dotted around to help pique your interest. On today’s sunlit afternoon, and the trees almost in full leaf, the view is an enticing one which has drawn many people and children out to enjoy this space.

Bramford Community Garden
Wandsworth Park

I end my journey arriving at Putney Bridge, but not before a quick scamper onto the Fulham Railway Bridge that has a footpath running along side it. I also stop at 13 Deodar Road where I spot an unusual building plaque. This one for the Grand Priory of England of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. A small unassuming building tucked away, but one that made me read about the Order and its history. I invite you to do the same.

Fulham railway bridge looking from the south shore

Picture of the Day

Meet Sif, the bearded dragon.

I’m surprised to see him sitting on a book (The end of Mr Y by Scarlett Thomas) with his keeper, both of whom were enjoying the sunshine. I had to ask if he was real and in doing so, got into conversation with Jermaine, a local resident who was enjoying the sunshine.

The soft tones of the book he’s sitting on blended nicely with the brick wall behind, and with each shot I got closer but making sure the eyes were the focal point. 

Sif is a good subject, and seems unperturbed by my intrusion, but just like taking pictures of children, I believe the secret is to shoot quickly and keep a close crop so that the subject fills the screen.

Sif, a bearded dragon

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ/6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/250; Focal Length – 37mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Blush

Social Media
YouTube, Instagram, Google PhotosTriptipedia – here I share some tips I use when travelling around London. A different twist on my ‘end of the line’ story


Categories
overground

#12: Clapham Junction – 20/06/2018

Clapham Junction promotes itself as ‘the busiest railway station in Britain’ and for the purpose of this blog, I have travelled here as it becomes the end of the line for two routes. Firstly the Overground from Highbury and Islington travelling in a south westerly route around London; and secondly, again the Overground, from Stratford travelling westerly. Both routes forming a virtual rail circle around London…so this will be the first of two visits.

The area immediately around the station is Battersea, Wandsworth and an area on the south shore of the Thames known as Cotton Row. This blog will focus on the Battersea and Cotton Row areas.

As I disembark onto one of the 17 platforms, I’m reminded it’s Royal Ascot week as the platforms are busy with top hatted gentlemen and fashionable be-hatted ladies on their way to the races making sure they comply with the Royal Ascot dress code. Before I leave the station, I explore the platform surrounds and inter-platform walkway, and you can only be impressed by its length, but less so by its relatively lack of services for passengers caught between train connections. One caught my attention though: Digby’s Patisserie.

It’s clear Clapham Junction is a commuter hub, well served by bus services and the station caters well for today’s velocipede riders.

Battersea is a sprawling area with its main shops concentrated around two main roads: Lavender Hill running into St John’s Hill, and at its crossroads, St John’s Road leading to Falcon Road and running into Battersea High Street. Shops reflect an independent mix of cafes and bars and I stopped for a quick chat with the owner of the Gas Monkey Bar and Grill, a newly opened American diner, who’s owner said business has been good. There’s also the impressive Grand Musical Hall, with one traditional high street store hanging on to the glories of the past by proudly displaying its former name: Arding and Hobbs

At either end of the main street, there’s the impressively 1920’s brick built library to the east, and an equally impressive crowd funded craft beer outlet – We Brought Beer to the west. If you look across the road, you’ll also see an interesting and yet declining piece of faded artwork above the Story Coffee shop reflecting the building’s history: Peterkins Custard. If you follow its history, you’ll unearth links with the movie industry as the mill where the custard was made was run and owned by James Arthur Rank.

A meander around the streets and back streets brought me to the edge of Wandsworth Common; a surprising find from a street sign in Beauchamp Road leading me to the Welsh Chapel; and a humorous connection with Harry Potter in spotting Severus Road.

I decide to stretch my legs and in search of the Thames,  I head for the Thames Path on the south shore between Wandsworth Bridge and Battersea Railway Bridge to an area known as Cotton Row. Its name suggests an area steeped in history with features such as Plantation Wharf, Clove Hitch Quay, Oyster Pier and Candlemakers, but alas I can’t find any details. However, as with large swathes of today’s riversides, you now see regeneration and redevelopment through the building of fashionable apartments, modern offices and walkways, and of course Old Father Thames himself, with its ever changing scenery. Oh yes, you’ll also find the London Heliport here too.

Heading back to Clapham Junction, I skirt around Winstanley Estates, an area of social housing which has evidence of crime through abandoned motor vehicles, and security grilled corner shops. However I am sure, as with most areas, it’s the people and communities that define the area and not the acts of the minorities. A poignant note to end my journey as I return to the station where there’s a derelict church promoting the words ‘Jesus Said I Am The Way’…

For more info, look up Clapham Junction Railway Station and Battersea on Wikipedia

Picture of the Day

And as with all good stations, there’s a neighbouring watering hole; here it’s classically called The Junction pub which tries to market itself as the 18th platform encouraging travellers into its ‘beer garden’.

The iconic wall art of David Bowie captures my interest immediately as I’m a lifelong fan of his music ever since I was introduced to Ziggy Stardust and his Spiders from Mars. So I have a personal connection with this image, which helps to connect my visit and enjoy the amusing way the pub is exploiting it’s position with the railway station. As you see, the wall on which the image is portrayed is in fact the back of the station.

I’ve cropped the bottom of the image to remove the somewhat untidy nature of the alley and beer garden entrance, and I think the final picture helps to focus on the wall art, the stations name and its proximity to the station.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Auto

Social Media

YouTube, Instagram, Google Photos, Triptipedia – here I share some tips I use when travelling around London. A different twist on my ‘end of the line’ story