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Lockdown

Lockdown Mayhem – August 2020

My third occasional blog sees me travelling around the northern stretches of Romford, and a  seaside visit down to the south coast at Eastbourne. I hope you enjoy this short selection of the month’s travel pictures?

North Romford

I had an ambitious notion of walking to Bedfords Park, a nature reserve managed by the London Borough of Havering and the Essex Wildlife Trust. I knew this would be a challenging day as it had been a number of years since I last visited and my recollection of getting there on foot was a little hazy. But I knew if I followed a simple trail through Raphael’s Park and Rise Park, it should be straight forward…

Well, despite Google Maps, and a belief I had a good sense of direction, I got a little lost. Not lost in the sense I didn’t know where I was, but more in that I believed the Park was more to the left of where I was walking (it was actually more to the right). So I ended up traversing across an open field in front of Bower House, part of the Amana Trust building, and emerging onto Orange Tree Hill instead of into the main Park area. Ah well, it was good exercise.

The Walled Garden in Bedfords Park is well worth a visit, staffed by volunteers, and it gives an insight into how an estate would have provided for itself in days gone by. My trek into the village of Havering-atte-Bower was concluded by my walking back towards Romford through Havering Country Park – a predominantly wooded forest with a striking avenue of Wellingtonia trees at the northern flank of the park. It was a very hot day so I ended my day returning to town by bus.

#01: Bedfords Park

a black and white picture with a treeline in the foreground and an overhanging branch framing a distant view across the Thames to north Kent


This view from the visitor centre in Bedfords Park looks across the Thames and into Kent. On a hot, clear day, it was a welcome, mid point stop after traipsing through the Park forest and open land.

For those who don’t know the area, the park sits in 217 acres of open land and deciduous woodland, between the northern boundary of the London Borough of Havering, and the village of Havering-atte-Bower.

Open parklands make it an ideal picnic spot and play area, and an enclosed deer park provides ideal viewing.

The park has a chequered history, with its origins being made up of two estates dating as far back as 1285. There are many internet references if you want to find out more. But for those looking for a nice day out, there’s something for all here. Alas, the visitor centre is currently closed due to the Covid19 restrictions, but don’t let that deter you from exploring this wonderfully maintained landscape.

  • Location: Bedfords Park, Havering-atte-Bower. Outside the Visitor Centre
  • Date/Time: Thursday 6th August 2020 at 12.21 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 54mm; Film Speed – ISO100 

#02: Spooky Tree

a black and white photo of a (presumably) dead tree as it has no foliage. A fe black birds are perched on some of the outlying branches

I spotted this on my way out leaving Bedfords Park from Broxhill Road overlooking the open space. It’s at a distance, so full zoom needed to capture the tree in shot, which seemed to be a good resting place for a few birds.

The tree stands defiantly in isolation amid an open plain. Perhaps one of a crop of trees felled maybe to create the open plain. But if so, why wasn’t this one felled too? Perhaps it has mystic or mysterious properties which draws the crows to stand guarding its barren branches. Even in the bright daylight, it reminded me somewhat of the Daphne du Maurier story The Birds, and subsequently translated into Alfred Hitchcock’s spooky film.

Time to move on methinks…

  • Location: Bedfords Park, Havering-atte-Bower. Broxhill Road, opposite entrance to St Francis Hospice looking south
  • Date/Time: Thursday 6th August 2020 at 12.51 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ10; Shutter Speed – 1/640; Focal Length – 200mm; Film Speed – ISO200 

#03: Havering-atte-Bower

a village sign of havering-atte-bower

Part of my intended day’s walking route was to make my way to Havering-atte-Bower. The northernmost village in the borough of Havering as it borders the county of Essex.

I’ve often driven through here whilst taking the back roads to join the M11 at Harlow, and in doing so wondered what lay behind the picturesque village green.

The village sign, which stands prominently on the village green depicts three scenes. The sign, incidentally, was unveiled in 2010 by the then Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, to commemorate the village’s 1000 year history.

I now take a little liberty in deciphering the three events depicted on the sign as despite many internet references to the sign, I’m unable to unearth any information about it’s make up. So here goes, but I’m happy to be corrected:

  • The top picture, I speculate, may represent the original ‘bower’ or country retreat and hunting lodge owned by Edward the Confessor, which later became known as Havering Palace. There are several interesting references worth reading to help you differentiate between the real and fabled history here: Wikipedia and Hidden London.
  • The final image represents the Havering coat of arms with the date 1042, no doubt symbolising the earliest known date of the village. This is some 44 years before it’s reference in the Doomsday Book under the name of ‘Haueringas’ meaning a ‘settlement of the followers of a man called Hæfer’

So the next time you pass a village sign, why not stop and explore its history too?..

  • Location: The Green, Havering-atte-Bower
  • Date/Time: Thursday 6th August 2020 at 12.56 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/640; Focal Length – 106mm; Film Speed – ISO400

Eastbourne

For over 40 years, Eastbourne has been my second home as it’s my father in law’s (FIL) home town. Our trip was to spend time helping FIL recover from a spell in hospital. Not Covid19, but nevertheless one that serves to remind us of our frailties. Thankfully, FIL is making a good recovery.

On this particular day, it was very interesting as there were high winds and I wanted to explore the shoreline under the pier at low tide. Very reminiscent of my childhood days exploring under the Pier in my own home town – Aberystwyth.

Personally I don’t think you can beat a bracing walk along the shoreline, the incoming tide splashing on your shoes and getting a little wet, and being mesmerised by whatever the sea and winds throw at you.

#04: Speckled Shoreline

a sepia toned black and white picture of eastbourne shoreline as the tide comes in

I noticed the tide times were quite favourable with the low tide conveniently at mid morning, so time enough to get the early morning chores done before making my way to the beach.

A combination of the strong winds and the effect on the tourist industry due to Covid19 saw the prom almost empty. Only a few hardened, or maybe foolish souls were out and about.

This shot is taken right on the shoreline looking west towards The Wish Tower and beyond to the Western Lawns where the frame of the summer ferris wheel stands out. I’ve applied a sepia filter to add a little mood to the shot, which shows tidal debris on the sandy beach being washed in by the incoming tide.

The upturned marker buoys in the distance, act as a warning of deep water and of the submerged barriers to bathers and swimmers during high tides.

  • Location: Eastbourne Beach
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 10.04 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 46mm; Film Speed – ISO100  

#05: Mid Flight

a black and white photo of a young seagull, amid wing, with the scrolling waves underneath

Seagulls are I think a bit like Marmite. You either like them or hate them. But for me they are synonymous with the seaside, chips and ice cream, and their squawk/cry is so unique that once you hear one, you instantly know what the bird is.

I once recorded a seagull sound as my phone ringtone…I always found it funny.

There’s a large flock of seagulls on the waterline, all standing into the wind blasting from the west. Adults and youngsters alike, the later with their distinctive brown and mottled plumage. Some are happy wading, others dipping for food, and there was one pair fighting over a pebble.

When on the wing, their flight pattern could be quite erratic, but taking off was an intentional act on their part. Their flight is determined by the swirling gusting wind, but give them credit, they’re just as happy being blown about to recover their intended flight path to achieve their goal. For some it was just to get back to where they left. But I suspect it’s not a folly to randomly fly into the wind and end up going backwards, but an attempt to gain some height to search for food.

This is one of the youngsters which I’ve captured showing off its immature colouring against the pier in the background and the incoming rolling tidal waves.

  • Location: Eastbourne Beach looking towards the Pier
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 10.11 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/640; Focal Length – 200mm; Film Speed – ISO200

#06: Watery Legs

a black and white picture of eastbourne's pier supporting legs

I took a similar picture in my teenage years when I first started exploring black and white photography. It was under the pier in Aberystwyth at about 5.00 am in the morning as the sun was rising behind and casting amazing shadows. That picture has stayed with me all these years and was one of the ones that inspire me to enjoy photography.

I had a notion to try and recapture that image, but clearly there are several things not the same: there’s no sun to cast shadows, and it’s not Aberystwyth Pier. Nevertheless, the hour or so I spent this morning taking a collection of pictures here was just as invigorating.

I probably collected a portfolio of over 20 pictures in this short spell, and this ONE, evokes the image I wanted to capture. Taken in black and white in homage to the image I had in mind, it also transforms what would otherwise be a dull and drab colour picture blanched by the windswept seaspray. The strong black tones of the pier legs against the rolling seahorses on the incoming tide sells the picture which is framed by the body of the pier at the top and the shadowy breakwater on the bottom.

I’m happy…

  • Location: Under Eastbourne Pier looking west
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 10.14 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO100

#07: Eastbourne Pier

eastbourne pier

Okay, okay, okay. This is a postcard picture of Eastbourne Pier. But it’s one that I played with for a while to decide how best to represent it.

You see, after over two years of using my trusted camera, I’m still learning how to get the best out of some of the settings, and this one jumped out at me.

Whilst composing the shot, the boulders in the foreground were an obvious candidate, and then I played with several settings. This is taken with an ambient setting, and what struck me immediately was how the golden towers just stood out as if under a spotlight. The picture looked exciting, almost like an antique postcard with the towers painted.

From local knowledge, the pier’s owner is overtly flamboyant and he has deliberately emblazoned all his properties (of which there are several) with splashes of gold. He even has a gold plated car!

  • Location: Eastbourne Pier from the shoreline
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 10.41 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 54mm; Film Speed – ISO100

#08: Just Visiting

a black and white profile photo of Mary Elizabeth. An elderly lady enjoying the windswept view looking out at eastbourne pier

Meet Mary Elizabeth.

This young lady was sheltering under the bandstand canopy away from the windswept rain as she caught my attention as I was walking by. She had been watching me take pictures along the shoreline and questioned whether there was a dead seal down there; I reassured her that what she could see was simply a collection of boulders.

That led to a long conversation where we shared each other’s stories and how she had come to be in Eastbourne during the Covid19 lockdown. A very adventurous lady with a thirst for life and a passion to enjoy herself.

If you happen to be her relative reading this, please rest assured that I was fully vetted by Mary before we chatted and that she decided I was OK to chat to. You see, as Bob Dylan once sang “the times are a changin” as her children have warned her not to talk to any strangers. I hope I’m no longer a stranger? It was a delight to meet you Mary…

  • Location: Under Eastbourne Bandstand shelter
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 11.09 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/250; Focal Length – 75mm; Film Speed – ISO400

#09: Stormy Sails

a black and white photo of a windsurfer caught beteen railings

Even in stormy seas there are those who want to challenge the elements. I just hope those who do, do so carefully and sensibly.

I caught this windsurfer as I peered through the railings on the Bandstand parapet, and I followed his progress as he sailed into the wind. I’m not sure how long he had been surfing for, but soon after this shot, the session came to an end.

Here ends my windswept walk along Eastbourne seafront, and my August lockdown memories

  • Location: Looking out to see from Eastbourne bandstand paramet
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 25th August 2020 at 11.14 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/640; Focal Length – 200mm; Film Speed – ISO250

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