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TfL Other Services Tramlink

#36: New Addington – 10/01/2019

The last of my TramLink destination journeys, this time to New Addington, South East of Croydon. The tram station, like most others is an open air affair with no distinguishing features or anything to report as unique. This is in part largely due to the TramLink’s construction in the later part of the 20th Century and designed and built in such a way to improve accessibility and keep costs down.

Today is a cold and overcast day, and the depressing weather conditions does nothing to enhance what seems to be a depressing area. I know first impressions are hard to dispel, but after wandering around for some time, my impression changes little.

For those who know my home town, you will be able to picture this area if I liken it to Penparcau but on a much larger scale. Both are areas of social housing specifically built in the mid-1900’s to cater for a growing population and the Wikipedia entry for New Addington is worth a read as it eloquently describes the area, it’s history and its social challenges. My comparison with Penparcau I believe is now no longer valid though as the two communities seem to have matured in different ways; maybe their relative sizes had something to do with that, but I leave that to other social commentators to debate.

Getting off at the tram stop at the northern end of Central Parade looking south I see the main low level shopping parade to my left with evidence of regeneration to my right. The dividing avenue is tree lined which in Spring I’m sure would look attractive with the trees in foliage. Immediately to my right is a collection of four wood sculptures of a bear, gorilla, dolphin and an eagle. There’s nothing around to explain their origins and other online commentators are also unable to find any helpful references.

Planned Regeneration

At the end of Central Parade is the library within which there’s a display of the planned regeneration of the area, and outside there’s a rather tired looking mosaic created by the local high school some time ago. The mosaic has been designed to reflect local scenes and characters, but like the surrounding area, it is somewhat scarred with damage that has remained un-repaired for some time.

Towards the centre of the parade there’s a memorial stone to those who died and were affected by the nearby Tram crash in November 2016. My observation here, as with other memorials I see around and about is ‘what’s the right length of time to leave flowers besides a memorial?’ This picture sadly depicts what ‘too long’ looks like.

Some regeneration work is well underway with the erection of a new leisure centre and in conjunction with the construction company, Wilmott Dixon, Croydon Council have partnered to set up a training academy for any local residents wishing to work in the construction industry; although  there is no evidence of anyone working in the academy at the time of my visit.

Heroes Walk – ‘a celebration of New Addington’

This is a local description of a walkway created between the current leisure centre and the new building encased with hoarding as either side is a building site. The full length of the hoarding is adorned on both sides of the walkway with black and white photographs of local residents who have been selected as having gone ‘the extra mile’ and provides a brief glimpse into the community spirit created by this art installation. The linked newsletter explains who they are and what they have achieved – well done to them!

Two miles, as the crow flies south from the library is Biggin Hill Airport, and I can hear the occasional plane taking off/landing. I’m tempted to head over, but the local bus service timetable makes that a slow journey. Equally, although within walking distance (about 3 miles by road), the daylight isn’t at its best and with the short wintry days I reckon it will be dark before I need to return home.

Addington Village

I decide, instead, to head north as I noticed on my tram journey to New Addington a stop named Addington Village. A mile and a half later, after passing housing estate after housing estate, and off the main road, I come to a very picturesque, albeit a very small village.

The village is dominated by the 11th Century flint encrusted Anglican church: St Mary the Blessed Virgin. Walking carefully over the gravestones outside the church, my thoughts turn to those I have known who are no longer with us. I’m particularly affected by a gravestone for a very young child which seems to have been placed discreetly in a corner and slightly obscured. Out of respect, I decide not to take any photographs other than of the once Archbishop of Canterbury, John Bird Sumner’s rather ornate memorial.

The church is open so I head inside and I’m in awe of the high vaulted ceiling, stained glass windows and altar, and I read about a War Hospital in the nearby Addington Park during World War 1 as part of the church’s history display.

Adjacent to the church is an appropriately named ‘Flint Cottage’ and just down the road is the ‘The Old Forge’ which is claimed to be the ‘last surviving working forge in the area’

Picture of the Day

This is the altar inside St Mary the Blessed Virgin church in Addington Village.

I took a series of shots with different settings, but this one is the most striking. I’ve not used flash here as I wanted to glorify the stained glass windows by keeping the rest of the church in the shadows. The combined effect of the light coming through the windows, and the low uplights in each recess transforms the final effect.

I’ve marginally cropped the picture to balance the three windows so that the middle one is centrally aligned, and a Bazaar (blue) filter to enhance the colours in the alcoves and windows. This is as close to the real image I could get, and I’m pleased with the outcome.

11th Century stained glass windows – St Mary the Blessed Virgin, Addington Village

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ4.5; Shutter Speed – 1/100; Focal Length – 27mm; Film Speed – ISO5000; Google Photo Filter – Bazaar

Social Media

YouTube, Instagram, Google PhotosTriptipedia – here I share some tips I use when travelling around London. A different twist on my ‘end of the line’ story

For more info, lookup New Addington on Wikipedia

Categories
TfL Other Services Tramlink

#22: Beckenham Junction- 12/09/2018

Arriving at the terminal station courtesy of Tramlink, Beckenham Junction is one of the three destinations created to serve the growing population east of Croydon. The platform is also adjacent to the main line station which offers through trains into Central London and into the heart of Kent.

Beckenham has a villagey feel but probably large enough to be called a town comprising of two main streets. Nothing unusual other than being relatively quiet as school has now resumed so the streets aren’t littered with school children. However walking deeper into the heart of the town I found myself on a wildlife adventure as I explored and circumnavigated the lakes in Kelsey Park.

The Town and its historic landmarks

Turning south out of the station I entered the meandering High Street which is dominated by St George’s Church and as well as being an imposing building, it’s adjoining cemetery is a Commonwealth War Graves location although sadly looking a little unkempt. Across the road is The Public Hall another equally imposing building, a multi-purpose Victorian built venue. It’s rooftop catching my eye as it has a Gothic Swiss villa look to it.

Walking down the hill, I  pass the old police station, now a trendy spa and restaurant, recessed from the main road where the local Farmer’s Market is occasionally held. In contrast, and slightly tucked away from the main road is The Coach & Horses, an attractively decorated traditional pub.

Continuing through HIgh Street, I note a mix of independent shops interlaced with a modicum of closed shop fronts, however the town is working hard to improve the landscape by repaving a significant part of the street.

At the bottom of the HIgh Street, there’s an iconic art deco Odeon Cinema still trading as a cinema, and this landmark acts as my turning point back up the High Street.

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Walking around the town I notice several alleys, cut throughs and dead ends that have novelty and informative street names highlighting their historic past. An interesting way to draw attention to otherwise bland and forgotten places. Here are some examples found at: Church Hill Alley; Thornton’s Alley; Legion Alley; Wood House Alley and Burton’s Yard

Wildlife at Kelsey Park

I stumble across Kelsey Park by chance at its entrance in Manor Way and take a peek in through the main entrance looking for shelter as the rain starts to fall. I later realise the stream flowing from the lake is named The Beck, no doubt helping to give the town its name?

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A combination of the rain and it being school term meant the park was quiet with only the hardy few, dog walkers and parents with non-school aged children in tow. Most were polite as we exchanged pleasantries, and some chit chat followed.

Time to swap the standard lens for the 75-300 mm zoom telephoto to take advantage of the wildlife. The lake was awash with a variety of birds and on a distant island two herons were encamped high up. Every now and then, a gathering of geese started their runway wing flapping take off display flying off seamlessly and in harmony with each other.

Most of the birds close to the shore were inquisitive enough that they came in close almost posing to have their picture taken, so I took advantage. Overhead, there was an unexpected sound, but for regulars tuned into wildlife around London will know that it’s no longer unusual to hear the squawking of a flock of parakeets; yes even in sleepy suburbia. I think I counted at least a dozen in a free flowing aerial display.

I probably spent an enjoyable hour bird watching under a chestnut tree sheltering from the rain, engaged in conversation with passers by equally enjoying the bird displays; but time to move on. And on leaving, I spotted a baby heron fishing in the stream; his/her eyes in a steely gaze mesmerised on a hidden fish…AND WHAAAM! Fish for lunch as the heron gulped it’s prey down it’s slender neck. It’s movement so fast, the best I got was a picture of the drips falling from the heron’s mouth. Satisfied with its catch, the heron walks onto the path and uses it as a runway to glide gracefully into the trees..

The day was an interesting sojourn,  reminding me to simply embrace whatever each location offers up as points of interest and record for my personal pleasure and entertainment.

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Picture of the Day

The lake in Kelsey Park boasts having at least two cormorants, one proudly displaying its wings high up in its tree perch, and another doing likewise perched on a post mid lake; a good opportunity to test my camera handling skills at full zoom. I rest against railings on a wall to steady myself whilst standing under a large tree sheltering from the downpour of rain.

I’ve enlarged and cropped the original photo to showcase the cormorant’s extended wingspan. There’s a little degradation in the quality and sharpness, but given I was a good couple of hundred metres away, I’m very pleased with the outcome. And a good test of the zoom lens’ quality at full stretch too

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 300mm; Film Speed – ISO800; Google Photo Filter – Auto

Social Media

YouTube, Instagram, Google PhotosTriptipedia – here I share some tips I use when travelling around London. A different twist on my ‘end of the line’ story

For more info, look up Beckenham Junction Station and Beckenham on Wikipedia