Categories
Blog Update

Insights

A little about how my stories and pictures have been received

First of all… Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! for all your support, followings and comments.

It’s been nearly two and a half years since I started my www.endoftheline.blog and I’ve now posted over 100 updates on my site.

I’ve also branched out across many social media platforms too. Starting with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and later onto YouTube and LinkedIn.

I started all this as a personal journey with little regard for any measure of success. But as the months passed by, and I acquired a growing band of social media followers, I started to be interested in how to cultivate a wider audience.

Consequently, I started to take an interest in my various channels to see whether, and if so how I could influence those who follow me and gradually increase my readership.

I’ll not pretend it’s been a meteoric success when compared to some influencers who are paid to endorse products; and that’s not something I set out to achieve. My success has been more of a muted growth, and it’s an approach I’m content with.

Since April 2020, I’ve been capturing insightful data from across all my channels, and I thought I would share some of this data with you by way of promoting the ‘best of post/picture by social media channels. So here goes…

Blog Site

I now have 41 followers: 23 who subscribe to my email updates on the publication of a new post, and 18 who follow my site through their own WordPress account.

My most successful month so far has been July 2020 which saw nearly 850 visitors arrive, and my busiest day was when I posted this picture within my Travel/Boats theme entitled ‘Moored under the Barrier’.

three yachts moored near the Thames south shore with the barrier in the near distance

Unsurprisingly, over 90% of my visitors are from the UK, with 4% from the USA and a growing interest from China, Germany, France and Australia. Visitor journeys to my site in the early days were predominantly from Facebook and Twitter (85% in 2018), but this has now shifted to over 60% coming through search engine queries.

Twitter

I started using my personal account and in hindsight I wish I had created a separate account specifically for my travels. But it’s a bit too late now as I’d have to corral my 209 followers – unless there’s anyone out there who can advise of an easy and painfree way of doing so?

Twitter insights are measured in two ways: impressions and engagements. My simple interpretation is: those who see it, and those who do something about what they’ve seen.

My most successful Twitter impression picture was published on 12/08/2020 under my Natural World/Creatures theme entitled ‘Feline Hungry’. A quick search across twitter reveals there are many cat lovers out there which might explain this picture’s popularity

a green eyed cat crouched under a car stafing intently at something nearby

My most popular Twitter engagement picture was published on 21/07/2020 under my Social/Remembering theme entitled ‘Kennington Remembers’. It was following this post I had a helpful response from the Friends of Kennington Park who helped me complete the story behind this memorial

a stone memorial in the grouns of Kennington Park

Facebook

I started my end of the line page with a loyal group of family and friends, but since I started advertising in May 2020, on a very small budget, I now have 59 followers.

Facebook has three insightful elements: Reached, Engagements and Story. Similarly to Twitter, my interpretation of these is: those who see my Facebook post, those who react to my Facebook post, and those who have viewed the separate storyline.

My most viewed and reacted to post on Facebook was published on 13/07/2020 when I wrote about my intended plans to transition from my daily picture of the day ‘Memories to Themes’. For the previous 81 days, I had published my picture of the day from each of my 81 travels, and was about to launch a new portfolio of my photographs which I’d categorised into 5 themes. If you missed it the first time around, here’s a link for another chance to read it.

My most popular Facebook story was published on 20/05/2020 from my Memories collection and was my picture of the day from my visit to Heathrow Terminal 4 on 20/12/2018

a concourse at Heathrow airport with a spotted ceiling of white sound proofing discs

Instagram

Instagram has two insightful elements: the main page, and similar to Facebook, there’s a story line as well.

Instagram is known predominantly for being a photo posting site, although there are those who post videos there as well. And it was on 30/05/2020 that I uploaded my most successful post. Not a photograph, but a video promoting my ‘draft’ photo album which I’ve ambitions of turning into a published book in the coming months. Have a look here.

I had two joint popular Instagram stories. One published on 03/06/2020 and the second on 09/06/2020. Both published as part of my ‘Memories’ collections. The first was my picture of the day from my travels to Paddington station on 10/04/2019 and entitled simply ‘9:32 pm’

The second was my picture of the day from my travels to Brixton on 28/05/2019 and entitled ‘Walking through Brixton’

paddington sttaion at night. a view of the main GWR clock with a statue of Paddington Bear underneath
a painted 'BRIXTON' mural  with geometric green, yellow and red hatched stripes on a wall under the main bridge by the station

YouTube

I’ve had limited success with YouTube, but what I have done is created a short video from my pictures after each of my days out. The videos on the whole last just over a minute, but it’s my belief that this may be too long to capture the interest of those who just want a quick picture to view. Nevertheless, I’ve persevered with creating the videos and offering them up through my blog site as an alternative viewing source.

My most successful video to date was following my visit to Woodford Green on 22/01/2019 and is one I created as a promotional video for The Broadway Deli & Grocery. Have a look at it here.

LinkedIn

This is a relatively new venture so I’m testing the waters, but I see it as an opportunity to promote my photographs to a different group of interested people. My most successful post on LinkedIn was my very first post here: Memories #08 which reflected on my Pictures of the Day between the end of April and the end of June in 2019.

What next – it’s been a matter of learning from experience, but I’ve now established a pattern of posting one picture a day rounded up with a summary of why I took the pictures every 7-9 days thereafter. So for those who want a quick ‘photo fix’ they get a regular feed, and at the same time I don’t bombard those who prefer the detailed description which they get on average weekly.

If you’re a regular reader, you know that during the past 4 months, I’ve been discovering my local community through my ‘Lockdown Mayhem’ series of pictures. This has been an attempt to explore places closer to home, whilst still being able to act responsibly by not travelling unnecessarily to help prevent the spread of Covid19 .

However, as the ‘new normal’ embraces people’s behaviours, and the declaration that it’s safe to travel whilst wearing a facemask, I will soon be resuming my travels to begin my new adventure: 

theendoftheline #02

I’ll be embarking on a new end of the line plan. One where I’ll be visiting Network Rail’s ‘ends of the line’ within the Tfl travel zones; and travelling on other Network Rail lines as far as I can within the Tfl travel zones. Why these limitations? Because I can still travel for free using my 60+ Oyster Card.

There are 63 stations in total to visit, so I hope that will see me still travelling and writing and taking photos into 2022.

Related Posts

Categories
Themes

Themes #05 – The Natural World

Welcome to this my fifth and final blog in my Theme series where I set out the reasons behind my recent selection. Over the past week I’ve posted pictures through my social media channels, and now I can give you a little more detail behind each picture.

I’m using the current Covid-19 lockdown period as an opportunity to showcase more pictures that may previously not have had any prominence, either through my travel blogs or more recently through my Memory collection. 

This week’s theme is all about ‘The Natural World’, a look at the diversity of living things and the environment in and around London. I’ve categorised my pictures into groups: Creatures, Vegetation, The Thames, Waterways, Skyscapes, Night Time and Reflections. I think the category titles are self explanatory.

I’ve selected these pictures on the basis that a) they’re an obvious fit, b) I like it’s artistic and/or photographic quality, and c) it has a good story to tell. I hope you agree, but feel free to drop me a line if you’d like to have any other suggestions?

Creatures – Feline Hungry

a cat ready to pounce from under a car staring intensly at something nearby

Birds dominated this category, from ducks, swans and even parakeets that have now naturalised themselves in London. Oh yeah, and one spider, but thought better of using that one in case there are too many readers with arachnophobia.
Come to that, I now hope there’s not too many readers with ailurophobia too.

Brick Lane is normally a hive of activity, full of onlookers enjoying the plethora of curry houses, or browsing the markets for bargains or memorabilia. But today is not one of those days, despite it being lunch time.

But this one resident was certainly on its look out for lunch. So was its intense concentration on what it was looking at (I didn’t see as I was concentrating on the cat), s/he didn’t bat an eyelid as I neared and crouched down to capture this. The cat is half under a parked car, and I’m half taking up the pavement, so the chance of any disturbance was high. But regardless, we were both resolved to see out our quest.

I didn’t wait to find out whether the cat caught anything as I was happy that I’d captured this shot. Maybe I should have?

  • Location: Brick Lane, East London
  • Date/Time: Friday July 12th 2019 at 12.29 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 5mm; Film Speed – ISO500

Vegetation – Tree Lined Shadows

a blck and white shadowy silhouette of rows of young trees

There’s a square of planted trees in Royal Victoria Square which have grown somewhat since originally planted. If you look at Google Maps Street View, there’s some evidence they are used as sheltered parking as some of the photos posted there have cars hidden between them.

There’s no such distraction today, in fact, it’s a bitterly cold winter’s morning with a crisp sharp sun which casts a harsh shadow through the trees. And it’s this effect that caught my eye. I waited for some onlookers to walk through so as to capture the scene uninterrupted and added a harsh black and white filter to accentuate the light and dark shading.

The solitary crow, slightly off centre/right, adds an extra little ‘still life’ quality to the final image

  • Location: Royal Victoria Square, Royal Docks, London
  • Date/Time: Tuesday January 28th 2020 at 10.45 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 63mm; Film Speed – ISO200

The Thames – No Access to The Thames Barrier

a long distance view of the Thames Barrier through a spiky and wired barrier in the foreground

Peer through the metal railings, just on the water line, and you can just make out two of The Thames Barrier pontoons.

This is at the end of a walkway just west of the Woolwich Ferry North Terminal, and it’s where I encountered a couple of fishermen who were sitting besides a chained anchor sculpture. They were not in the mood to chat, so I walked on.

This is taken in black and white with some saturation to emphasise the contrast between the black railings, and rippling sun on the water. The railings clearly designed to discourage any attempt to climb over into the adjacent industrial park, but nevertheless it did make for an excellent study in light and shade.

  • Location: Footpath off Henley Road and Pier Road, North Woolwich
  • Date/Time: Monday September 2nd 2019 at 3.26 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ16; Shutter Speed – 1/500; Focal Length – 23mm; Film Speed – ISO400

Waterways – Paddington Basin

a night time view of the Thames Basin with high rise offices on either side of the water and their lights and those from moored barges reflect on the still water

This was a return visit to Paddington with the intention of capturing some night scenes. Thankfully I was suitably wrapped up as in the early spring night it had turned bitterly cold.
It was an evening for black and white photography, and it ended up being a very successful one too.

I’m very pleased with the outcome here as I was also test driving a new lightweight mini tripod. I don’t think I’d have successfully captured this long exposure shot otherwise which, combined with a narrow aperture and wide angle, creates a stunning view of this setting.

I also think the shot is elevated by the stillness of the basin water as it helps to accentuate the clean lines created by the reflections from the moored barges and street lighting.

  • Location: Looking east from Paddington Basin Footbridge into Paddington Basin at night
  • Date/Time: Wednesday April 10th 2019 at 8.47 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ14; Shutter Speed – 8s; Focal Length – 32mm; Film Speed – ISO800

Skyscapes – A Winter’s Sun

a shot gazing into a wintry sun with a victorian lamp providing the only point of reference

The sky has featured quite prominently in my photography during my travels. They’re mostly long shot cloudscapes, thundery skies or airplane vapour trails. But regardless of their pedigree, the London backdrop always makes for interesting pictures.
The setting here is a wintry January morning with a thin hazy cloud transforming the sun into an opaque ball. I’ve walked along the Thames Path north shore from Hammersmith to Fulham, passing the football ground before exploring Fulham Palace – well worth a visit.

It’s lunch time, so I’m not surprised at the number of joggers and serious runners there are around. Where the path is wide enough it’s OK, but they seem to have little regard for other walkers when the footpath narrows into almost one way traffic. 

The shot, taken straight into the sun creates an almost evening feel, and I positioned myself to frame the sun within the crosshair vapour trail and Victorian esque faux street lamp. The end result has the appearance of retaining the Victroian spirit I think.

  • Location: Thames Path, north shore between Hammersmith and Fulham
  • Date/Time: Tuesday January 29th 2019 at 12.51 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ14; Shutter Speed – 1/1000; Focal Length – 36mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Night Time – Peabody by Night

a five storey block of flats at night time and in black and white. The doors are lit up and the shot has an interesting symmetry

This is one of London’s social housing estates managed by the Peabody Trust. This is in Roscoe Street, just off Whitecross Street in EC1 and I believe it had recently been redeveloped.
This picture fits a number of other categories: architecture/residential, architecture/windows & doors and The Arts & Design/Patterns & Symbols.

But here it is in NIght Time. I was up in London walking around the Barbican Centre and surrounding areas one evening, and I saw this view which was too good to pass by. The estate is accessed through a footpath between two parts of Roscoe Street with a large car park in front, so its frontage is uninterrupted, making it easy to position myself in a central spot to take this wide angle shot.

There’s enough brightness from the collection of door lights to have taken this without the need for a tripod; and it’s symmetry and black and white presentation made this an ideal candidate for this category.

  • Location: Peabody Estate, Roscoe Street, EC1
  • Date/Time: Thursday December 5th 2019 at 4.17 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ4.5; Shutter Speed – 1/100; Focal Length – 32mm; Film Speed – ISO6400

My final themed picture and I’m pleased this one ends my review of two years of travelling.
It had been raining hard when I was in Finchley Central and as the rain cleared, I started wandering off the main street – Ballards Lane and found myself in a discreet housing estate in Dorset Mews. Not somewhere you’d find unless like me you explore hidden corners.
This is a view from the end of the Mews back into Ballards Lane through the locked gates that once were the entrance to Newton Wright Limited 

Reflections – Newton Wright Ltd

an old works gated entrance for 'Newton Wright Limited' taken in black and white and a reflection captured in a still puddle in the foreground

My final themed picture, and I’m pleased this one ends my review of two years of travelling.

It had been raining hard when I was in Finchley Central and as the rain cleared, I started wandering off the main street – Ballards Lane, and I found myself in a discreet housing estate in Dorset Mews. Not somewhere you’d find unless like me you explore hidden corners.

This is a view from the end of the Mews looking into Ballards Lane through the locked gates that once were the entrance to Newton Wright Limited 

This is all that remains of the factory that once made x-ray equipment and scientific instruments and stretched as far back as 30 houses behind Ballards Lane.

The reflection jumped out at me as I reached this point, but I had to take a few shots before this one as there was a slight breeze that rippled the puddle and obscured the reflection. But it was well worth the wait to capture this mirror image of a recently forgotten historical memory.

  • Location: BallardsLane (opening into Dorset Mews, Finchley Central
  • Date/Time: Tuesday September 24th 2019 at 2.12 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 45mm; Film Speed – ISO800

Related Posts

Categories
Themes

Themes #04 – Arts & Design

Welcome to this my fourth blog in my Theme series where I set out the reasons behind my recent selection. Over the past week I’ve posted pictures through my social media channels, and now I can give you a little more detail behind each picture.

I’m using the current Covid-19 lockdown period as an opportunity to showcase more pictures that may previously not have had any prominence, either through my travel blogs or more recently through my Memory collection. 

This week’s theme is all about ‘The Arts & Design’, a look at the creative side of life in and around London. I’ve categorised my pictures as follows: Sculptures & Statues, Street Signs, Patterns & Symbols, Station Names, The Arts and Entertainment. I think the category titles are self explanatory.

So I’ve selected these pictures on the basis that a) they’re an obvious fit, b) I like it’s artistic and/or photographic quality, and c) it has a good story to tell. I hope you agree, but feel free to drop me a line if you’d like to have any other suggestions?

Sculptures & Statues – Silent Dockers

a black and white image os a statue of three dockers going about their business. The background also captures the shadowy image of some of the cranes used in the docking heyday

Another from my day walking around The Royal Docks. But first a word about the abundance of sculptures and statues around London. Some sponsored privately and others publicly, but there’s definitely a trend to open up this creative art form to a wider audience.

It’s always delightful to find an unexpected work of art in a public place. Some are static and others only on display for a short time. So whenever you have the chance to look at them, make sure you do as you’ll not only learn about the work, but maybe look further into the artists or the reason for the work in the first place.

This represents the almost forgotten industry that once made London docks the economic centre of the western world. It’s a larger than life bronze work depicting three dockers grafting. One pushing a barrow, another crouched and the third, possibly the gaffer, overseeing. In silhouette, the gaffer looks almost as if he’s looking at his mobile phone – ha if only. But nevertheless the log book he’s using probably meant as much to him as we feel about our mobile phones today.

I’ve taken the shot directly into the sun to create the strong silhouette and made sure the crane artefacts appear in the background to help with the story telling. I think it’s quite dramatic.

  • Location: ‘London Dockers’ sculpture by Les Johnson in Royal Victoria Square outside the Excel Centre
  • Date/Time: Tuesday January 28th 2020 at 10.43 am 
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ11; Shutter Speed – 1/800; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Street Signs – No.1 Street

a simple street sign displaying 'No 1 Street' from SE18 in the London area of 'Royal Arsenal'

What’s so interesting about a street sign? Well for me it helps identify (obviously) and in a way helps characterise its setting. 
I’ve seen some humorous and/or novel street names, such as Severus Road (for Harry Potter fans), Barnes Pikle and Moromon Terrace, but as soon as I saw this it made me question ‘is this where London started?’

Obviously not, but similarly as with Apsley House which has the postal address ‘No. 1 London’, No 1 Street has a unique sense of ‘I’m the first’

This is a redeveloped street of fashionable residences in the Royal Arsenal Heritage site in Woolwich. The thing about London street signs is that they not only carry the postal district (SE18), but usually some other distinguishing reference point. Sometimes the borough name, and sometimes some other historical reference as in this case, the area described as Royal Arsenal…neat.

  • Location: No. 1 Street, Royal Arsenal Heritage Site, Woolwich
  • Date/Time: Tuesday October 22nd 2019 at 1.15 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/250; Focal Length – 34mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Patterns & Symbols – The RLH

this is a section of the east facade of the Royal London Hospital covered in an array of aerofiols which creates a striking striped black and white covering

Buildings, be they old or new, are built predominantly to be functional, but for some they are designed to demonstrate the architect’s creativity. And having tramped hundreds of miles around London, I’ve seen a wide and diverse demonstration of both attributes.
Some buildings are powerfully prominent, be it for historic reasons, or as observed in more recent times for their flamboyant use of materials. We all have a view, whether we express this or not. Prince Charles clearly didn’t hold back when describing the proposed extension to the National Gallery as a ‘monstrous carbuncle’,  back in 1984.

Notwithstanding their architectural merits, I also look out for patterns in the design. Maybe it’s because of my ‘organised mind’ or the need for order, but I do get some pleasure from seeing things that others might not.

Sometimes patterns are intentionally designed, and sometimes, as in this case, they only emerge at certain times of the day. 

The contrast between the two types of finish is in itself of interest. But with the late morning sun high up casting a shadow on the underside of the aerofoils, the resulting stark black and white effect is quite striking. 

  • Location: Royal London Hospital viewed from Stepney Way, Shadwell
  • Date/Time: Thursday January 16th 2020 at 11.18 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 106mm; Film Speed – ISO400

Station Names – Welcome to Reading

this is a view across Reading station where there are five 'Welcome to Reading' signs

As a matter of record, I would photograph the station names as I travelled on my ‘endoftheline’ journey. Some would be from an interesting angle, but at the end of the day, the station name is a point of reference.

It could be for those arriving at their destination for reassurance that they are at the right station. Or conversely for those travelling to the station to catch their train, reassuring them they are at the right station.

There is a third reason and this picture helps show that. It’s for those weary travellers on long tiring journeys who may just pop their head up to look through the window amid slumber to read where they are? 

The array of signs on each of the 15 platforms here made this so unmissable, and when I viewed them across the platforms, it seemed my view was totally obscured by ‘Welcome to Reading’!

  • Location: Reading Station platforms viewed from Platform 15
  • Date/Time: Tuesday February 4rg 2020 at 11.19 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 106mm; Film Speed – ISO1000

The Arts – A Budding Artist

a child's painting of a boat with charicature crew of a captain and a number of stewerdesses. Emblazoned with the American flag and advertising American Express

I have many examples of street art and graffiti artwork that I could have selected for this category, and whichever I’d have chosen would have just rights to be here.
However, I’ve plummed for this child’s artwork which is part of a wider display.

This is one drawing of many on display emblazoned on the side of building hoardings surrounding a new build at Wood Wharf and Thames Street in Greenwich. Clearly created in conjunction with the adjacent Meridian Adventure Play Centre as part of the developers approach to work closely with the local community.

This one in particular stood out as the artists’ pen strokes are quite delicate, and s/he are obviously looking for marketing opportunities given the invitation to American Express to ‘come along’. Of all the pictures on display, it’s the only one I can see where the artists had mastered the creative signature. It’s amusing.

  • Location: Seen on building hoardings around a construction at Wood Wharf on Thames Street, Greenwich
  • Date/Time: Tuesday August 14th 2018 at 3.47 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 49mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Entertainment – Let The Weekend Begin

five rows of tressle tables with an array of revelers eating and drinking in groups

Musicians, funfairs, museums and exhibitions make up this category, and of the pictures I’d selected for this category, they have mostly featured before in my weekly blogs. 
But this one of the Boxpark by Croydon Station represents a different type of entertainment. The type that the nation has missed for the last four months.

My day at Croydon had been an exciting one, one where I had been introduced to the world of street art, as part of Croydon hosting Rise Festival. Nevertheless, It had been a long day and I was heading back to West Croydon via Croydon station. Now I’d heard of the concept of Boxparks, but not experienced one, and what a buzzing place this was.

Bare in mind it’s just gone 5.00 pm on a Friday afternoon, and people are heading home, so the scene I share with you is of those relaxing, meeting friends and ‘switching off’ after a busy week’s work. The scene is influenced by the DJ in the background who was noticeably cranking up the bass as I stood, almost mesmerised by the sound of excitement in the air. 

Look closely and see how many groups there are just chilling with their mates or colleagues, or just waiting for someone else to join them for a drink. What a great way to begin the weekend. But sadly one that’s not been seen for several months due to the Covis-19 restrictions. No doubt there will be those cherishing the easements recently introduced.

  • Location: The Boxpark at Croydon Station
  • Date/Time: Friday September 7th 2018 at 5.21 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ4.5; Shutter Speed – 1/125; Focal Length – 33mm; Film Speed – ISO320

Related Posts

Categories
Themes

Themes #03 – Architecture

Welcome to this my third blog in my Theme series where I set out the reasons behind my recent selection. Over the past week I’ve posted pictures through my social media channels, and now I can give you a little more detail behind each picture.

I’m using the current Covid-19 lockdown period as an opportunity to showcase more pictures that may previously not have had any prominence, either through my travel blogs or more recently through my Memory collection. 

This week’s theme is all about the diverse ‘Architecture’ we enjoy around London, and I’ve compiled them into the following categories: Residential, Industrial, Stations, Commercial, Windows & Doors, Station Fixtures & Fittings and Street Furniture. I think the category titles are self explanatory.

I’ve selected these pictures on the basis that a) they’re an obvious fit, b) I like it’s artistic and/or photographic quality, and c) it has a good story to tell. I hope you agree, but feel free to drop me a line if you’d like to have any other suggestions?

Residential – Southwyck House

a black and white picture of the facade of Southwyck House in Brixton. Made up plain bricks, small windows and a zig-zag feature to brak up the plain view

I wrote about this during my Brixton visit but felt it was worthy of a second airing.
Southwyck House looks vastly like a prison with a concrete zigzag to delineate the frontage with its co-joining staircase looking like a caged pen to keep the inmates in. This is a housing complex built in the 1970’s in anticipation of a motorway flyover which was never built.

One commentator records that it is known locally as ‘Barrier Block’ as indeed that was its design purpose. Hideous to think that this social housing was considered acceptable enough to be built. The architectural design whilst creating some features, does nothing to uplift the feeling of isolation and incarceration the building exudes.

My thanks though to @brixtonbuzz who has drawn my attention to the fact that ‘The Barrier Block actually provides a high standard of social housing. The back is all windows and open balconies’

Although taken in black and white to add effect, to be honest, the building creates the drama itself.

  • Location: Southwyck House which sits along Coldharbour Lane in Brixton
  • Date/Time: Tuesday May 28th 2019 at 11.27 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 33mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Industrial – Overhead Tension

a collection of pulleys and wires set against a blue sky

I’ve debated whether this should be included under the ‘Architect’ theme as it’s more a piece of engineering. However I’m content that engineering is a form of architecture in that it’s not only functional but as this image portrays, it has a design element too.

This is a collection of pulleys and tension bars keeping the overhead electric cables taught. I saw the image in my mind, and set against a cloudy blue sky, this helps to highlight it’s elevated position.

It’s a simple shot, but not one you would normally see unless you happen to be standing on Bethnal Green Overground station platform looking up admiring the overhead infrastructure.

  • Location: Standing on Bethnal Green Overground station looking at the overhead electric cabling
  • Date/Time: Friday July 12th 2019 at 10.48 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/500; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Stations – Euston Plaza

a dull blue/grey view of a hidden part of Eustaon Plaza with a high rise view as the backdrop and the foregound focussing on a white tiles walkway and stairs

With few exceptions, the stations I’ve visited have been predominantly rural and styled in the first half of the 20th century. And the main termini in Central London modelled and shaped by the gothic style favoured by the victorians.

But Euston station is different. Re-built as part of the concrete revolution in the 1960’s and not to everyone’s taste. It’s a functional station, but yet it too has its charms when you look deeply into its nooks and crannies.

This isn’t an obvious shot, and not a location you would see unless you went looking for it. It’s by the bike park under the bus terminal canopy at the front of the station and I’m looking up at the office tower at 1 Eversholt Street.

I’m attracted to the almost black and white colour palette and distinctive 60’s tiled stairwell and overhead walkway which classically evokes the architectural style of its period. The reference to the bikes is intentional to demonstrate the station’s transient purpose. I’ve emphasised the blue tone in the final image to highlight the white tiles against the industrial building facades that surround them.

  • Location: Behind the main plaza at Euston Station
  • Date/Time: Thursday May 24th 2018 at 11.25 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 21mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Commercial – Pure Geometry

an array of square blocks each with a cross pattern creating a visual pattern

This is the facade to one of Watford town centre’s car parks.
The structure is a simple one made of a wall of building blocks consisting of four square segments, each of which has a cross pattern. No doubt architecturally sound, but the end result is visually stunning.

I suspect quite a quick and relatively cheap way to build, but I’m not judging it on it’s constructional or economic qualities but on it’s visual impact.

Whether you stand close or from afar, the effect is mesmerising, and maybe I should issue a health warning to migraine sufferers (of which I am one), as staring at the spots may trigger some visual disturbance.

This may appear a simple shot to take, but I had to exercise patience as the facade covers the parking bays and in some shots I captured the red parking lights as drivers arrive/leave. Whilst these made for a different outcome, I wanted to highlight an undistracted simplicity to this structure, which this example brings. I like it…

  • Location: CitiPark, Church Street, Watford
  • Date/Time: Tuesday June 18th 2019 at 12.29 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 28mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Windows & Doors – The Seedier Side of Watford Hospital

some tired looking doors and windows in a corner of this old hospital with water damage from downpipes on show. The colours are drab which highlights this tired view

First of all, let me confess I have a ‘thing’ for windows and doors. I can’t explain it but I’m always drawn to them when on holiday. Maybe it’s because of their variety, colour or location. Whatever the reason I know I’m not alone with this enjoyment and I feel it’s right that I have this as one of my Architecture categories.

I’m looking at the outbuildings facing Vicarage Road, and believe this is the corner of the Social Services unit and the Chaplaincy. The scene portrays a somewhat unloved corner of the hospital complex and no doubts reflects the significant challenges faced in maintaining a large NHS Trust these days.

The colours are slightly enhanced to emphasise the state of disrepair, but nevertheless not a welcoming site to new or returning visitors who pass by here whilst alighting from the adjacent bus stop.

  • Location: Watford General Hospital, Vicarage Road, Watford
  • Date/Time: Tuesday August 20th 2019 at 1.05 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5; Shutter Speed – 1/125; Focal Length – 45mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Station Fixtures & Fittings – Arched Pipework

looking up into the roof void of this platform canopy , taken in black and white. the view shows off the symmetrical arched duct work intersected with rainwater down pipes

This picture is indicative of the station’s Victorian architectural character with the view taken through the supporting roof arches holding up the central platform’s canopy.
A simple shot taken from the staircase leading from the platforms, and looking down the length of the ironwork to capture the symmetry of the supporting arches.
Although taken originally in colour, the station colour scheme is predominantly black, echoing the Underground’s Northern Line style. I have though applied a black and white filter to give the otherwise faded colouring a bit of life.

  • Location: High Barnet Northern Line Underground Station
  • Date/Time: Tuesday January 21st 2020 at 12.40 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 70mm; Film Speed – ISO6400

Street Furniture – Walking Through Litter

a black and white shot taken through the opening of a littler bin framing a couple walking through

This is Lovers Walk, a small passageway which invited me in to take its picture, but I can’t find a composition that works well.
Almost walking away, I realise I’m leaning against a litter bin and notice its two open mouths face through to the passageway providing an interesting perspective. 

As I crouch down, I spot a young couple walking through the frame and I set about taking a series of shots composing their approach as the centrepiece; and they oblige unwittingly by keeping to the centre of the path.

Sometimes, you have to smile as the opportunities present themselves, as the lesson here is always be ready to capture that moment.

  • Location: Peering down Lover’s Walk, just off Ballards Lane, Finchley Central
  • Date/Time: Tuesday SEptember 24th 2019 at 1.49 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 47mm; Film Speed – ISO500

Related Posts

Categories
Themes

Themes #02 – Travel

Welcome to this my second blog setting out the reasons behind my themed selection. Over the past week I’ve posted pictures through my social media channels, and now I can give you a little more detail behind each picture.

I’m using the current Covid-19 lockdown period as an opportunity to showcase more pictures that may not previously have had any prominence, either through my travel blogs or more recently through my Memory collection. 

This week’s theme is all about ‘Travel’ which I’ve categorised as follows: Trains, Road Vehicles, Boats, Air Travel, Bridges & Tunnels, Walkways and Platforms. I think the category titles are self explanatory.

I’ve selected these pictures on the basis that a) they’re an obvious fit, b) I like it’s artistic and/or photographic quality, and c) it has a good story to tell. I hope I can convey these reasons for you here?

Trains – One In, One Out

two trains: one coming out of Liverpool Street station and one going in, all underneath an array of overhaed electric cables

As a seasoned commuter through Liverpool Street station for over 25 years, this was a familiar sight. But I’d never stopped to really look at the intricate infrastructure that supports a modern railway station.
I’m standing on the Bethnal Green Overground Station looking east towards The City and overwhelmed by the frequency of trains going into and out of the main line station.

There are six rail tracks here: three outbound and three inbound. However the magic of the infrastructure is that these six lines open up into the delta of eighteen platforms at Liverpool Street station. Quite an amazing engineering feat when you think about it.

As a passive observer I noticed that the first pair of lines were generally dedicated to the Metro Service up to Shenfield. The middle pair for the Greater Anglia Service into Essex and East Anglia, and the right hand pair for the Overground Services to Enfield Town, Cheshunt and CHingford

The trains I’ve caught are fairly standard workhorse class: the Class 321 and Class 379.

  • Location: Standing on Bethnal Green Overground station looking east towards Liverpool Street station and The City
  • Date/Time: Friday July 12th 2019 at 10.56 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5; Shutter Speed – 1/800; Focal Length -210mm; Film Speed – ISO250

Road Vehicles – Cycling to Bow Church

a lone cyslist in an orange dayglo jacket being followed by the number 205 bus headed towards BowChurch. The City skyscape in the background

I’d spent a little time looking at the statues of Catherine and William Booth along Mile End Road and started to wander away, headed to cross the road towards Wapping. But as I stopped to cross the cycle lane and main road, the view of cyclists against The City skyscraper backdrop was interesting

I stationed myself on the edge of a bus stop island that separated the cyclists from the main road and had an unrestricted view of the traffic. The traffic came in waves being managed by traffic lights further down the road, so once I’d determined the flow, I observed patiently whilst the traffic came towards me.

This shot is one of many, but I particularly like the combination of London Buses and the sole cyclist, separated by a precarious row of plastic cones. Enough to give sufficient confidence for the cyclist to travel in safety. The colour contrast works well too, although I have played with this in post production to help the colours stand out.

This is a fairly typical scene right across London; especially noteworthy is the fact the cyclist is totally plugged into his headphones, no doubt listening to something to help him concentrate and zone out of the rest of the traffic madness around him.

  • Location: Standing beside the main A11 Mile End Road just by the statue of William Booth and opposite the Tower Hamlets Mission
  • Date/Time: Thursday January 16th 2020 at 11.00 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 125mm; Film Speed – ISO640

Boats – Moored Under The Barrier

three sailing yachts moored at low tide along the south Thames shoreline. The Thames Barrier in the background

We can easily forget that The Thames is also a place for the smaller leisure craft as the river is visibly dominated by barges, ferries and patrol boats.
Just out of shot on the right hand side is the Greenwich Yacht Club which has an interesting clubhouse as it stands on stilts out into the river. A must see building if you’re in the vicinity.

The Thames Barrier makes for a helpful backdrop with the now too familiar ‘fashionable’ riverside apartments making up the distant horizon.

I was surprised when I selected this picture, but perhaps it’s because of its simplicity and reminder that the river supports many water based pastimes. The tide isn’t full, so the muddy shoreline is visible, but its colour offsets nicely the mooring buoys, and they all in turn complement the three yachts.

  • Location: I’m looking eastwards towards The Thames Barrier whilst standing by the Greenwich Peninsula Ecology Park
  • Date/Time: Wednesday November 14th 2018 at 12.28 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/500; Focal Length – 95mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Air Travel – Heavens Above

an overhaed aeroplane with its vapour trail appearing to almost colide with the tip of the church steeple and cross

This was a clear crisp January day with no cloud cover whatsoever. I saw the plane’s vapour trail across the sky and imagined this shot would make for an interesting composition. 
I found a position along the street where I’d assessed I could capture this moment. It wasn’t quite right, so I found myself shuffling along, keeping one eye open for traffic and other pedestrians. Thankfully neither interrupted me.
Taken in black and white, the clear blue sky provides for nice dark canvass to highlight the vapour trail. The trick was to capture the moment when the plane and steeple were almost aligned.

I did also capture the moment where the two were almost touching, but felt this near miss has a more symbolic reference in that heaven and earth don’t/can’t meet in our lifetime?

  • Location: Wood Street, High Barnet opposite The Parish Church of St John The Baptist looking skywards
  • Date/Time: Tuesday January 21st 2020 at 1.46 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/400; Focal Length – 75mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Bridges & Tunnels – A Bridge to Calcutta

an overhead walkway of red brick with bright coloured artwork on display through the windows

This is a view I would pass most days when I worked at The Whitechapel Building in Aldgate. It’s part of the London Metropolitan University which is directly opposite, and this is a walkway joining two parts of the university complex.

The bridge provides access to the Calcutta Annexe which is the new home of the university’s Fine Art and Photography studios (Cass). The bridge caught my eye as on this particular dull and overcast day, the colourful symbols in the windows high above contrasted nicely against the dark sky behind. I’ve applied a colour saturation filter to highlight the red brick and yellow shapes, which I think helps to set off the final image.

  • Location: The junction of Pomell Way and Old Castle Street, Aldgate, looking overhead at the London Metropolitan University walkway into its Calcutta Annexe
  • Date/Time: Thursday September 26th 2019 at 11.52 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/500; Focal Length – 24mm; Film Speed – ISO160

Walkways – A Richmond Cobble

looking up at a grey cobbled street with two distant pedestrians in the background providing a blue and orange colour contrast

Water Lane, as its name implies is a lane leading down to the riverbank from the main high street. At the water’s edge it dips into the river as a slipway, and at high tide, the water can overflow onto the surrounding area.
The light was catching the damp cobbles helping to highlight their shape. And to capture this shot, I waited for the pedestrians at the top of the lane to provide enough of a colour splash to contrast against the slate grey of the cobbles.

The cobbled lane is peculiar in two ways. First it’s devoid of yellow lines; no doubt deliberate to help preserve the original authenticity of the lane. And secondly, the cobbles have two tram lines of heavier duty stone running its length; no doubt to make the passage of trailers smoother than would otherwise be the case on an all cobbled lane.

  • Location: Water Lane, Richmond
  • Date/Time: Tuesday February 19th 2019 at 11.25 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 46mm; Film Speed – ISO400

Platforms – Dalston Junction

a dark picture with a train emerging into the station backlit by the sunlight outside. Pillars on either side of the platfporm draw your view towards the train

It’s the symmetry and colour splash in the dark station entrance that makes this shot.
This is one of a series in which I followed trains into and out of the station. I’ve picked this one as the train’s position, just emerging from the bright outside into the dark station with the rails still highlighted helps guide your eye into the centre of the picture. 

The orange splashes on the supporting pillars, representing the London Overground’s colour style, also draws your eye towards the focus – the train.

It took me a while to get the settings just right to create this wide angle effect; but with a relatively slow shutter speed and a wide aperture, I’ve been able to convey the mood and emphasise the effect.

  • Location: Inside Dalston Junction station
  • Date/Time: Tuesday August 13th 2019 at 11.05 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ4.5; Shutter Speed – 1/10; Focal Length – 32mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Related Posts

Categories
Themes

Themes #01 – Social

Welcome to this my first blog setting out the reasons behind my themed selection. Over the past week I’ve posted pictures through my social media channels, and now I can give you a little more detail behind each picture.

I’m using the current Covid-19 lockdown period as an opportunity to showcase more pictures that may previously not have had any prominence, either through my travel blogs or more recently through my Memory collection. 

This week’s theme is all about the ‘Social’ aspect of life, which I’ve categorised as follows: People, Food & Drink, Sport, Religion, Retail, Remembering and Neglect & AntiSocial. I think the category titles are self explanatory.

So I’ve selected these pictures on the basis that a) they’re an obvious fit, b) I like it’s artistic and/or photographic quality, and c) it has a good story to tell. I hope I can convey these reasons through this week’s blog?

People – Man in Finchley

A black and white phot of a man standing still looking at his phone opposite King Edward Hall along Finchley Road

This was an opportunist shot as this man walked into frame and hesitated at the junction before crossing Arcadia Avenue. He was looking intensely at his mobile phone and I felt that the combination of his laid back pose, his concentration and the interesting background made for a good composition..

I was shooting mostly in black and white that day and I felt that the somewhat ornate, but now redundant, sundrenched King Edward Hall was a perfect setting. It’s a rare moment where I happen to be in the right place to capture this moment in time?

Who knows what the gent is doing or thinking, but I’m glad he stopped as he did as he was totally oblivious to my presence.

  • Location: Arcadia Avenue in Finchley Central looking into Regent’s Park Road
  • Date/Time: Tuesday 24th September 2019 at 1.11 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/250; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Food & Drink – Late Night in Spitalfields

A colour photo inside Spitalfield Market as it's closing. Colourful tables and chairs in teh foreground with overhead string lighting casting a moody feel

This shot was taken during my meanderings around Liverpool Street Station when I eventually ended up in Spitalfields Market in the early evening. Traders are just shutting up for the day and the coffee shops and most restaurants have already closed.

This colourful view of a seating area through metal railings shows how things will look twice a day. At the start of the day, and as in this picture, at the end of the day as the restaurant staff have placed all their tables and chairs neatly together.

The moody lighting, colour palette and industrial setting gives this shot a warm feel, and one that portrays a pleasant stopping point during a busy day rummaging around the bustling daytime market.

  • Location: Spitalfield Market
  • Date/Time: Friday March 15th 2019 at 6.42 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/125; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO5000

Sport – No Games Today

A rain soaked terrace on the edge of Hackney Marshes sports ground

I found myself on the fringes of Hackney Marshes after wandering around Stratford and through the Olympic Park. I was headed towards New Spitalfields Market (how coincidental is that in relation to the previous post) when it started lashing down with rain and the only cover I could find was under the Eaton Manor Walk bridge as it crossed the main road.

Such was the deluge that the bridge offered little cover so after a short while I resigned to getting wet. In an attempt to get something out of the moment, I walked up the side path to the bridge and realised the steps extended into a very wide terracing for spectators to enjoy the spectacle of players on the nearby football pitches.

There were no games, but the weed strewn rain drenched steps gave a sense of how this area might look on a weekend with spectators made up of friends and family cheering on sons and daughters.

  • Location: Access steps to Eaton Manor Walk bridge over the A106 Eastway
  • Date/Time: Thursday June 13th 2019 at 12.06 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ4; Shutter Speed – 1/100; Focal Length – 28mm; Film Speed – ISO125

Religion – Waiting for Jesus

am na sleeping on the doorstep of the Universal Pentecostal Church in Brixton

This image of a rough sleeper on the steps of the United Pentecostal Church under the sign ‘Jesus Cares’ was one waiting to be captured.
It portrays a sense of hope, optimism, or maybe sheer desperation, and whichever it is, the passing pedestrians seemed little unconcerned. Maybe the gentleman was a regular and knew he would get sanctuary at some point: I hope he did?

  • Location: Standing on the corner of Bucknor Road and Acre Lane in Brixton
  • Date/Time: Tuesday May 28th 2019 at 12.11 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ7.1; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO100

Retail – Cloth Ends

A saturated black and white photo of several ends of cloth rolls creating an array of circular patterns

My day started at Dalston Junction, a little known end of the line: one created as part of the Parliamentary line to Battersea Park station. And after a browse around the junction, I amble through the back streets, following the crowds really, into the busy heart of Dalston Kingsland.

Before I know it, I’m strolling through Ridley Road street market, just around the corner from Dalston Kingsland station. It’s market day and the street is heaving with local shoppers vying with the traders for the best deal of the day. Mostly fruit and veg, but there’s the occasional whiff of fish or butchered meat, and as it’s a very hot day so the flies are plentiful. Yuck!

At the back end of the market, where Ridley Road joins St Mark’s Rise, the type of stalls change, and this is where I found this one. I’d say over three quarters of the open front is crammed with these rolled up remnants, leaving a narrow doorway into the stall itself. But it’s the remnants that catch my eye. Colourful as they are, I’ve taken this in a black and white setting to add character to the picture, and in a way reflecting the grittiness of the market itself.

It’s an interesting reminder of the market, and one I’ll keep for a while.

  • Location: A trader along Ridley Road street market in Dalston Kingsland
  • Date/Time: Tuesday August 13th 2019 at 11.57 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 48mm; Film Speed – ISO320

Remembering – Kennington Remembers

A memorial stone in Kennington Gardens

My visit to Kennington, on the Northern Line is a bit of a stretch of the imagination as it’s not physically a terminal station. However trains do end here, and after going around the Kennington Loop tunnel, they end up on the opposite platform ready to return northbound. So I’m content it’s a justified visit.

Kennington Park is a short stroll from the station and on this autumnal day, it was a very pleasant walk around the park enjoying the surrounding artefacts and gardens. When I stopped to read the inscription on this sculpture, I realised how poignant the moment was as it was a commemoration of an event that happened on this day in 1940.

What troubled me was that despite the fact someone had gone to the trouble of commissioning this sculpture, it now seems to have become forgotten as there was no evidence that the date had been remembered.

For my part, I share with you the inscription:

‘History despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived but if faced with courage need not be lived again Maya Angelou

‘To commemorate the wartime suffering of the people of Kennington and in particular over 50 men women and children who were killed on 15th October 1940 when a bomb destroyed an air raid shelter near this spot. Rest in peace’

Read the full story of Kennington’s Forgotten Tragedy here. My thanks to the Friends of Kennington Park who shared this story with me.

  • Location: Kennington Park, just inside the entrance opposite the Sugar Pot on the main A3 Kennington Park Road
  • Date/Time: Tuesday October 15th 2019 at 12.14 pm
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 24mm; Film Speed – ISO200

Neglect and AntiSocial – Not Funny!

two clown'ish grafitti faces on a  car park wall in Romford

I found this on one of several days out in Romford. On this particular dank day, I was walking around the town’s perimeter on a mission to traverse all the town’s central car parks. Why? To view the town where I have lived for over thirty years from a different perspective.

Street art or wall art has become a common feature right across London, and I was first introduced to this art form when in Croydon at the outset of my end of the line story. There I met several artists, very creative artists whose passion shone through in their works. It was in Croydon I also appreciated the difference between street art and graffiti: the former is approved whereas graffiti is not. More a random bedaubing, often in discreet locations where the perpetrators are unlikely to be seen.

This is a very simple example made up of two heads with a smile, or grimace. Maybe a budding street artist testing out his/her skills. Nevertheless, a sight that seems to crop up only too often around London these days.

  • Location: Inside a stairwell at Angel Way Car Park, Romford
  • Date/Time: Thursday December 12th at 11.55 am
  • Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ3.5; Shutter Speed – 1/80; Focal Length – 23mm; Film Speed – ISO800

Related Posts