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Memories No 02 – from Heathrow T5 to Hammersmith

This is my second blog outlining the stories behind my ‘Pictures of the Day’. For this week’s review, I travel to the ends of the Circle, Overground, Piccadilly and the Waterloo & City lines during late May and through June in 2018.

It was an interesting month in terms of locations and experiences as I started getting to grips with my camera settings and with those with whom I met.

You can still play your part in helping me decide on the best picture, as I’d like to canvass your thoughts on which is your favourite picture. You can reply through my blog, directly by email or via my social media platforms. And if you’d like to explain why, that will be helpful too.

So here goes for week 2. I hope you enjoy this?

#08: Heathrow T5: ‘World Rainbow’

23/05/2018 – This is taken outside the main terminus where there’s an open air seating area. It’is a bright sunny lunchtime so employees and travellers alike are grabbing a quick snack or just waiting for their connection.

There’s a large display at either end of the seating area showing a selection of the the IATA (International Air Transport Association) three letter destination codes displayed in a semicircle. This picture tries to capture the essence of the airport at ‘a moment in time’ as the reflection shows those at rest, but the traveller in the centre foreground reminds us that he’s going somewhere (or just arrived). And the smoker on the right reminds us that this is now an outside habit…

I’ve tried to keep the shot simple, framing the main traveller within the destination arc. Who knows where he’s bound? The Alpaca filter strengthens the sunlit shrubbery and helps to draw the eye towards the central figure.

My thanks to a Facebook reader who suggested this title.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ6.3; Shutter Speed – 1/320; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Alpaca

#09: Euston – ‘In Loving Memory’

24/05/2018 – This stained glass window is taken inside St Pancras Church and commemorates the life, loves and deaths of the 19th Century architect William Milford Teulon’s family.

This was a poignant moment during my day around Euston station and a moment of admiration too, of the open and free nature of the church: it’s doors open to all comers at all times. I was alone at the time of my visit and able to enjoy the church’s array of stained glass windows. Why this one? 

With the sun shining through, the colour’s magnificence transforms an otherwise dull spot in the church into one of thoughtfulness, hope and salvation to those looking for it. It was a moment not to pass and on reflection, it has provided an opportunity to learn a little about the architect himself.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ3.5; Shutter Speed – 1/60; Focal Length – 20mm; Film Speed – ISO160; Google Photo Filter – Palma

#10: Richmond – ‘Brewers Lane’

06/06/2018 – This is a delightful narrow street of bijou style shops: Brewers Lane. A busy lane for the casual browser and attractive for the tourists no doubt intrigued by the array of advertising signs and banners all fighting for their own space and attention.

The decorative lights, strung across the lane will no doubt increase the attractiveness of the lane, but in broad daylight, it casts a net, as a canopy, over the area.

I’d originally planned to crop out the shoppers and browsers to focus on the shop signs, but on reflection decided to keep them in as they give more meaning and sense of purpose to the picture’s composition.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO250; Google Photo Filter – Palma

#11: Bank – ‘£sd’

07/06/2018 – This is an historical shot for those old enough to remember the pre-decimal paper money. The red-brown ten bob note; the green pound; the rarely seen five pound note and the never seen brown ten pound note. The picture is taken inside the Bank of England’s museum which is  accessed through their airport style entrance in Threadneedle Street.

I think this is an appropriate picture to remember my visit to Bank station

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 43mm; Film Speed – ISO2500; Google Photo Filter – Metro

#12: Clapham Junction – ‘Platform 18’

20/06/2018 – And as with all good stations, there’s a neighbouring watering hole; here it’s classically called The Junction pub which tries to market itself as the 18th platform encouraging travellers into its ‘beer garden’.

The iconic wall art of David Bowie captures my interest immediately as I’m a lifelong fan of his music ever since I was introduced to Ziggy Stardust and his Spiders from Mars. So I have a personal connection with this image, which helps to connect my visit and enjoy the amusing way the pub is exploiting it’s position with the railway station. As you see, the wall on which the image is portrayed is in fact the back of the station.

I’ve cropped the bottom of the image to remove the somewhat untidy nature of the alley and beer garden entrance, and I think the final picture helps to focus on the wall art, the station’s name and its proximity to the station.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 39mm; Film Speed – ISO100; Google Photo Filter – Auto

#13: Enfield Town – ‘Enfield Vicarage’

27/06/2018 – 36 Silver Street is Enfield Vicarage, a Grade II listed building with some parts dating back to the 16th Century. Situated next to St Andrew’s Church, this two storey white rendered building is nicely lit in the sunshine.

I’m standing on the opposite side of the road trying to capture this scene through passing traffic as just down the road are traffic lights which control the flow along the street. I’m also trying to judge the passing pedestrians to create a sense of movement against the stark white walls. This lady with her shopping trolley, presumably on her way into town, obliged. I think this shot nicely sets the scene, helped by the fact the pedestrian is wearing a light top in contrast with the brick wall but also complementing the whitewashed walls.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ8; Shutter Speed – 1/160; Focal Length – 20mm; Film Speed – ISO250; Google Photo Filter – Auto

#14: Hammersmith – ‘Baguettes

28/06/2018 – Hammersmith open air food market sits nicely along Lyric Square positioned between King Street and Beadon Road, and Olivier’s Bakery is the first stall I approach as I enter the food market. It’s fast approaching lunchtime so the square is very busy with office workers out to sample the variety of culinary delights on offer.

This is my first attempt at ‘food’ photography, but thankfully I was given a free hand to explore the stall without getting in their way as they served their customers.

This is a simple, close up shot of the day’s freshly baked baguettes displayed rather neatly, although more out of necessity so that the stack remains intact. Nevertheless, their colour and geometric shape makes for a rewarding reminder of the day. I’ve enhanced the picture with a yellow filter to promote the baguette’s natural colouring. My free baguette was nice…

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ5.6; Shutter Speed – 1/200; Focal Length – 55mm; Film Speed – ISO160; Google Photo Filter – Palma

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DLR TfL Other Services TfL Underground Waterloo & City

#51: Bank (again) – 09/05/2019

A return today to Bank station courtesy of the Dockland Light Railway (DLR). A day where the weather forecast was looking pretty grim and dismal, the first in over a year. So I did some advance planning on where to go if the weather turned bad…which it did. Today turned out to be a tour of central London stations including Bank, Monument, Cannon Street and London Bridge.

Today was also a study in underground passageways, and my thanks go to other Underground Twitter enthusiasts who have posted pictures which have inspired some of mine today.

Bank Station

Those of you working in the City, or have a need to change at Bank know how busy it is, and somewhat complicated now whilst improvement works are being undertaken. The station, which is inter-connected with Monument provides underground access to the Central, Northern, Circle and District lines; the DLR and the Waterloo & City line. It’s main feature is the 300m long adjoining walkway running directly under King William Street.

From personal experience, I was caught off guard one summer’s day when lugging a heavy suitcase from one station to the next without realising how many flights of stairs there are, and how long it takes when battling with commuters charged with only one goal in mind – getting to their end point as quickly as possible.

My study of the underground has yielded many pictures in an attempt to capture the constant flow of travellers making their way through the tunnel between the two stations, or on route to/from Waterloo via the underground tunnels and travelator. Some travellers have a clear plan on where they are going and others are bemused by the the whole experience. Nevertheless, I’ve compiled some of the pictures into animations to help set the scene.

I decide to head for Monument Station which is a popular destination for tourists who flock to the aptly named Monument, opened in 1677 as a permanent reminder of the Great Fire of London.

Outside the station, street promoters try to catch the eye of the passer-by by handing out leaflets with a promise of free cash ‘…if you sign up today!..’

As I walk around to the Monument, I notice that I’m now in The Ward of Candlewick and ask myself, what is a Ward? The answer is here…

Saint Magnus the Martyr and The Thames Path

London is littered with churches of all denominations, and from my own observation, the City has more than its fair share. Heading down towards the embankment and the Thames Path, I pass this church and explore its surroundings, and as I do, I spot a plaque declaring the churchyard formed part of the roadway onto the original London Bridge. Intrigued, not out of religious conviction, but more out of historical interest, I head inside and I’m struck by the ornate decorations; full of colour and all the religious icons you would expect to see.

By the doorway there is a long, if not at least ten feet long, encased model replica of the original London Bridge bedecked with houses and shops. The vaulted ceiling is magnificent, as indeed are the stained glass windows in homage to the good saint, and before leaving I feel compelled to light a candle.

The church sits on the river so a quick canter around the back of the church and I’m overlooking the river with The Shard for company ahead of me, and London Bridge to my right. There’s what appears to be a collection of stones as a seating area, but on closer inspection there’s an inscription explaining the stone bench was part of an Architectural Student Award in 2009. Each stone engraved with a floral design and its name.

I pass under London Bridge, which has a mysterious eerie feel to it, and could it be that ghosts of eons past are still lurking as you just don’t know what would have transpired here over the years and centuries. Or maybe as it was about to pour with rain the ominous sky affected my senses. Who knows?

I didn’t give any thought to the name of the footpath until I came to Cannon Street station rail bridge – Hanseatic Walk. But before walking under the bridge, I spot a wall plaque, a little difficult to get at to read. But when I do, I see it was erected in 2005 to commemorate a site where 400 Hanseatic merchants lived in a German self-governing enclave for nearly 600 years up to the 19th Century.

Cannon Street station is my third station of the day, each of which are no more than 300 metres apart such is the density of the working population that it needs so many stations to cope with the daily influx. This station has recently been modernised and therein stands the Plumber’s Apprentice, erected at the location where once stood the Livery Hall of The Worshipful Company of Plumbers

London Bridge station and its surrounds

One stop by train across the river and I’m at London’s most recently modernised station where the architects have blended the modern functional needs with the classic cavernous catacomb like arches. Now that’s it’s finished, the station provides an exciting feast for the eye as I journey through the station. Glass and lighting are the two main features used to excellent effect to bring out a modern design.

I’m asked by a security lady to explain what I’m doing and although she doesn’t stop me, she does suggest a visit to Network Rail’s reception would be in order to check on whether I need permission to take pictures. Thankfully, through their twitter feed, I’m directed to their very helpful and clearly set out online Guidelines for taking photos at stations.

I exit the station south side and I’m immediately drawn to a sight of red ants crawling over a full size train carriage atop a low level building. Go see it as it’s an impressive piece of art from Joe Rush – never heard of him? Well he also created the Arcadia spider at a recent Glastonbury festival.

The artwork helps to promote one of London’s newest open air food and container box outlets at Vinegar Yard. It is almost deserted, with only a couple of seated guests and a few others, like me, wandering around taking photos; the reason being that it is cold and raining, so not the ideal combo for this place. Nevertheless, I suspect as the evening wears on, more brave souls will be attracted to eat and drink here later.

This was a surprising and delightful find at the end of the day, and is partly what this sojourn is all about – a personal discovery of communities that otherwise might not get seen by outsiders.

Picture of the Day

This was one of my first photos of the day and after a few test shots to get the settings right, I waited for a sequence of trains to pull into the end of the DLR at Bank station. With a slow shutter speed to capture the train’s movement, I was pleased, and surprised, to get the focus just right as this is a hand held shot. 

The position of the train as it is just about to pass the station sign was planned, and as the sign states the platform is for ‘alighting only’ so there were no other passengers waiting other than me. I was half expecting to get stopped by passing Tfl staff as I was loitering there for quite a while, but guess they’re used to enthusiasts hanging around. 

The wide angle shot lets me get the full length of the station in frame, and the fast ISO setting lets me get the depth of field I wanted. Maybe the lighting could have been slightly darker with a slower film speed setting, but sometimes a compromise is OK.

Settings: Camera – Canon EOS 200D; Aperture – ƒ/22; Shutter Speed – 1/5; Focal Length – 318mm; Film Speed – ISO12800; Google Photo Filter – Auto

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